Moor End Academy

Enjoy and Achieve: Every Day Matters

Special Educational Needs

Moor End Academy is fully inclusive and welcomes all students with a wide range of Special Educational Needs.  Steps are taken to ensure that children and young people are treated with fairness and equality, supported and encouraged to achieve their potential.  Students identified as having a Special Educational Need have the same access to Quality First teaching, enrichment opportunities, educational visits and trips.  All children and young people have an entitlement to participate and enjoy activities and learning experiences outside of the classroom.  The Academy supports students in all phases of their education with personal centred transition packages.

The Academy believes that all students should be respected and valued as an individual and be supported to achieve their potential.All students receive a creative, varied yet balanced curriculum which is differentiated to meet individual needs so that they can learn and make at least good progress. They are assessed using appropriate assessment tools and guidelines. All students have equal access to resources, provision and interventions as needed.

In addition, we also provide for those with additional needs/SEN through provision that is additional to or different from that made generally for others of the same age. This means provision that goes beyond the work which is matched to need and learning arrangements normally provided as part of high quality, personalised teaching. It may take the form of additional support from the teacher or require involvement of specialist staff (Teaching Assistants or SEN Teacher) or external support services.

Our Academy has a Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO) who is responsible for the management of provision and support for identified pupils with SEN. The SEN team also trains, supports teachers and other staff to enable them to provide appropriate assessment and focussed provision for children in their class with SEN. All teachers are teachers of SEN students and as such provide quality first teaching which takes account of the particular individual needs of students with SEN within the classroom.

Meet the team

Executive Principal – Ms J Acklam OBE
Principal – Additional Needs, SEN, Visual Impairment – Miss K Walton
Assistant Principal – Student Wellbeing and Support – Mr J Wilson
SENCO – Special Educational Needs Coordinator – Miss S Davies
Governor with responsibility for SEN – Professor J Sweeney
Teacher of SEN – Mrs C Wilson
Senior ETA (Educational Teaching Assistant) – Miss A Pickering
ETA (Educational Teaching Assistant) – Mrs N Majeed
ETA (Educational Teaching Assistant) – Mrs S Marlow
ETA (Educational Teaching Assistant) – Mr M Pickering
ETA (Educational Teaching Assistant) - Ms K Ward

Academy address: Dryclough Road, Crosland Moor, Huddersfield, HD4 5JA
Email: office@edu.moorend.org
Telephone: 01484 222230
Age range: 11-16

“The very strong promotion of students’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development ensures that they thrive in the supportive and highly cohesive learning community. High aspirations, outstanding teaching and the rich curriculum result in outstanding achievement” OfSted June 2012

Local Offer across Kirklees

Areas of Need Explained

The new SEN Code of Practice 2015 states that there are four main areas which cover additional needs:

Communication and Interaction
Children may have a delay or disorder in one or more of the following areas:

Attention / Interaction skills:
•  May have difficulties ignoring distractions.
•  Need reminders to keep attention.
•  May need regular prompts to stay on task.
•  May need individualised motivation in order to complete tasks.
•  Difficulty attending in whole class.
•  Interaction will not always be appropriate.
•  May have peer relationship difficulties.
•  May not be able to initiate or maintain a conversation.

Understanding / Receptive Language:
•  May need visual support to understand or process spoken language.
•  May need augmented communication systems Frequent misunderstandings.
•  Repetition of language and some basic language needs to be used to aid their understanding.

Speech / Expressive Language:
•  May use simplified language and limited vocabulary.
•  Ideas / conversations may be difficult to follow, with the need to request frequent clarification.
•  Some immaturities in the speech sound system.
•  Grammar / phonological awareness still fairly poor and therefore their literacy can be affected.

Cognition and Learning:
May have difficulties with the skills needed for effective learning such as use of:
•  Language
•  Language, memory and reasoning skills
•  Sequencing and organisational skills
•  An understanding of number
•  Problem-solving and concept development skills
•  Fine and gross motor skills
•  Independent learning skills
•  Exercising choice
•  Decision making
•  Information processing

Children may have a specific learning disability such as dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia or dysgraphia.

Social, Mental and Emotional health
May have difficulties with social and emotional development which may lead to or stem from:
•  Social isolation
•  Behaviour difficulties
•  Attention difficulties (ADHD)
•  Anxiety and depression
•  Attachment disorders
•  Low self esteem
•  Issues with self-image

Sensory and/or Physical
These pupils may have a medical or genetic condition that could lead to difficulties with:
•  Specific medical conditions
•  Gross / fine motor skills
•  Visual / hearing impairment
•  Accessing the curriculum without adaptation
•  Physically accessing the building(s) or equipment.
•  Over sensitivity to noise / smells / light / touch / taste.
•  Toileting / self-care.

Our SENCO

We would like to introduce our SENCO, Miss Sam Davies.  

Miss Sam Davies

SENCO

Sam previously trained as a Social Worker but decided her passion was for teaching and spent 2 years working as a Teaching Assistant before training to become a Teacher.  Sam has worked at Moor End Academy since 2006 and holds the National SENCO Award.

Trained to identify and address the special educational needs and disabilities of the students at Moor End Academy, Sam works closely with staff, students and their parents/carers to develop appropriate strategies to support learning.

Roles and Responsibilities of the Special Educational Needs Coordinator

The SENCO is responsible for the operation of the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Policy and coordination of specific provision made to support individual students with SEND.  The SENCO is available to meet and talk to parents/carers and is involved in the transition process of students from Junior school and post 16 transition, ensuring the needs of students with SEN are met and the transfer is as smooth as possible. The SENCO liaises with staff to monitor student’s progress and plan further interventions where progress is lower than expected.  The SENCO has regular contact with a wide range of external agencies that are able to give more specialised advice.  

If you have any concerns regarding Special Educational Needs or Disabilities, please do not hesitate to contact Miss Sam Davies on 01484 222230 or email sdavies@edu.moorend.org

Additional Needs Team

   
Miss K Walton
Principal
Additional Needs
  Miss S Davies
SENCO
  Mrs C Wilson
SEN Teacher
         
   
Miss A Pickering
Senior ETA
  Mrs S Johns
Student Support
Administrative Officer
  Mrs E Fensom
Resource Technician
         
   

Mrs N Majeed
EAL ETA
(English as an Add. Lang.)

  Mrs S Marlow
ETA
  Mr M Pickering
ETA
         
       

Ms K Ward

ETA

       

The Additional Needs Team are here to support your child in overcoming any difficulties that get in the way of their learning.  The support each child gets will depend on their individual need.

Students may come out of class to work 1:1 or as part of a small group for support with
•  Dyslexia
•  Dyspraxia
•  Literacy
•  Numeracy
•  Read, Write Inc – Phonics
•  Social Skills
•  Personal Reflection

The team can offer support for parents and carers with ways to help their child at home.  As part of their role, they may signpost your child to other services.

We will track the attendance of your child and offer support where needed.

Ensuring outstanding and effective communication with staff, the team support teachers in delivering lessons which meet the needs of your child.

Support is given to teachers through drop-in sessions for new and existing staff; links are in place with the core subjects of Maths, English and Science and regular training on all aspects of learning needs and disabilities.

Access Arrangements

For some students additional arrangements and adjustments can be made to enable them to fully access a range of tests. This is might include:

•  additional time
•  a reader
•  a prompt
•  rest breaks
•  use of a scribe
•  word processor
•  provision for practical assistance for students with a physical disability at the time of the exam or test.

Key staff assess eligibility when students are in Year 9 and will make the necessary applications for these arrangements where appropriate.  A letter is sent home to parents/carers explaining if any Access Arrangements have been granted for their child.

Access Arrangements replicate the way in which a pupil normally works in class, and fully reflect an established need. Access Arrangements do not offer an advantage to any pupil, and are only put into place when there is a clear and established barrier to learning which can be evidenced through assessment and intervention in usual working practice.

Medical Support

Moor End Academy is an inclusive community that welcomes and supports students with medical conditions and needs.

Mrs Louise Gatfield and Mrs Sue Johns, ensure that all staff and members of the governing body, understand their duty of care and are informed and regularly trained about medical conditions. All supply and temporary staff are informed of their responsibilities to support students with identified medical needs.

Mrs Sue Johns works closely with the following stakeholders, to support all students with health and medical needs.

• Parents and carers
• School/community nurse
• The Executive Principal and the Head of School
• Teachers
• Special Educational Needs Coordinator
• Student support team
• Members of staff trained in first aid
• All other staff
• Local healthcare professionals
• School Governors
• Transport provider
• Catering provider

This support includes the following:
•  Meeting with parents/carers to discuss their concerns within a confidential environment
•  Making sure staff are updated on student’s medical needs
•  Prepare Healthcare Plans
•  Organising training and obtaining advice from relevant health professionals to meet student’s individual needs
•  Arranging for school nurse referrals
•  Oversee the administering of medication including asthma inhalers
•  Meeting with students with various medical conditions

Specialist Provision - VI

An Introduction
Kirklees Council supports children and young people with autism, physical impairments, speech language & communication needs, hearing or visual impairment through a group of Specialist Provisions. These are specialist bases within mainstream schools that make sure children who need it get extra support and help from specialist teachers and support staff.

Moor End Academy is proud to be the host of one the Specialist Provisions for visual impairment within Kirklees. The Academy has 12 permanent places for secondary aged students with severe visual impairment. In addition, the specialist provision provides outreach support for secondary aged students who have a visual impairment in their local mainstream schools.

Moor End Academy belief that all students should be respected and valued as an individual and achieve their potential. All students within the Specialist Provision are included in mainstream lessons with additional support from a specialist team of staff. As for all students with Special Educational Needs they receive a creative, varied yet balanced curriculum which is differentiated to meet individual needs so that they can learn and make progress.

Through appropriate assessments and knowledge of the children and young people within the Specialist Provision, we are able to provide modified resources and interventions.
 
Visual Impairment
The new Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (2014) says that there are four main areas, which cover Special Educational Needs.
•  Communication and Interaction
•  Cognition and Learning
•  Social, Mental and Emotional health
•  Sensory and/or Physical

Visual Impairment (VI) is included as part of Sensory.
Many children and young people wear glasses prescribed by their local optician, but do not require additional support within school and so would not need additional support from the Specialist Provision.

The children and young people that are supported by the Specialist Provision have a medical diagnosis of a visual impairment from a specialist doctor called an ophthalmologist.

This may lead to:
•  Difficulties accessing the curriculum without adaptations.
•  Moving around the building.
•  Difficulties in their learning and understanding.
•  Social difficulties.

The Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) has some excellent advise and support for parents and carers of children with a visual impairment. Their website can be found here.
 
Specialist Provision Staff

   
Mrs L Gatfield
Assistant Principal
Additional Needs
  Ms L Foden
Lead Teacher of VI
  Mrs C Fielding
Teacher of VI
         
   
Mrs J Moorhouse
Senior ETA
  Mr D Bellafonte
ETA
  Mrs L Goral
ETA
         
   
Ms J Stead
ETA
 

Mrs C McHugh

ETA

  Mr P Nabozny
Braille and V.R. Tech. 
         
       
Mrs L Crowther
Braille and V.R. Tech.
       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

- Your Lead Teacher for Specialist Provision:
Ms Laura Foden
I work as part of the Student Support Team within the Academy. I work closely with all the staff within the Specialist Provision as well as all teachers and support staff. I have the responsibility for running and co-ordinating the additional specialist support for all children and young people with a visual impairment of Secondary School age across Kirklees.

My job includes;
•  Organising the teachers and support staff within the Specialist Provision to make sure we give the best support to the students who need it.
•  Advice and support to teachers on how to plan and adapt work for students with visual impairments.
•  Working with outside agencies e.g. Ophthalmology, Careers Services and Educational Psychologists.
•  Assessment of students’ visual impairment needs to help us to plan for them.
•  Meeting with parents and carers to discuss how we can work to support their child or for formal meetings such as Annual Reviews.

As the lead teacher I have studied the following qualification;
•  Mandatory Qualification for Teachers of Children with Visual Impairment (BPhil)

- Teacher of Visual Impairment   
Mrs Clare Fielding

They will work with your child in the VI base doing additional curriculum teaching e.g. braille, or literacy/numeracy development. They will also work with your child in lessons if they require additional support.

The teachers also do outreach work to support children and young people with visual impairments in the local mainstream schools. They will give advice and support to help these students make good progress.

- Educational Teaching Assistants (ETA)
Mrs Julie Moorhouse (Senior ETA)      
Ms K Ward
Mrs Leann Goral
Ms Jane Stead
Mr Daniel Bellafonte
Mrs Catherine McHugh

They will work with your child supporting them in lessons. Or they may work 1:1 with your child on a specific programme of work e.g. touch typing.

- Braille and Visual Resources Technicians
Mrs Lynn Crowther
Mr Phil Nabozny

The technicians modify resources and adapt technology. They may work with your child to teach them how to use software or technology to help them to do their work.

- Habilitation Officers
Stuart Adams
Marie Logush

They will work with your child outside of the school grounds to teach them additional skills to help them to get around. E.g. how to catch a bus, for children who are blind they teach cane skills. When your child starts a new school or goes to College, they will help them to learn how to get to and around the new building.

If your child needs additional mobility work they will get in touch with you to get your permission and discuss what mobility skills you think your child might need and explain what they are going to do.

Additional Support and Interventions
All the students that are part of the Specialist Provision require things that are different or additional to their friends to help them to achieve.

Things that might help them;
•  Specialist teaching from a Teacher of Visual Impairment.
•  Support in lessons from a specialist Educational Teaching Assistant.
•  Training in use of Low Vision Aids (e.g. magnifiers).
•  Access to Specialist Technology (e.g. CCTV, ipads, modified laptops).
•  Provision of modified large print or braille for all lessons.
•  Access to Mobility/Habilitation Officers.
•  Additional support for exams (Access Arrangements e.g. readers, scribes, practical assistants).

Every half term we do interventions with all the students in the Specialist Provision. We use an ‘Assess, Plan, Do, Review’ to look at what is working well and where your child may need more help. You are welcome to attend these interventions to talk about how your child is doing.

FAQs – Visual Impairment

How will you know if children or young people need extra help?
If you think, your child is having trouble seeing things you should take them to see your local optician. Signs that your child may be having problems with their sight could include;  sitting too close to the TV, rubbing their eyes a lot, holding objects very close to the face, blinking a lot or one eye turning either in or out. The NHS recommends that all children have their vision checked every 2 years. More information can be found on their website here.

Your child may just need glasses to help them to see things. This does not mean they will need support from the Specialist Provision. If your optician thinks they may have an underlying visual impairment which needs further investigation they will advise you what you will need to do next.

The children and young people that are supported by the Specialist Provision need to have a medical diagnosis of a visual impairment by a specialist doctor called an ophthalmologist. We also support secondary aged students in their local mainstream schools who have a visual impairment through outreach. Referrals are taken from Ophthalmology and SENCos in schools.

If you have concerns about your child in Moor End Academy or their local school in this area you could speak to;
•  Your child’s form tutor.
•  Your child’s SENCo.
•  The Teacher for VI that supports your child.
•  The Lead Teacher for VI.

How will children and young people with visual impairments be supported?
As for all students at the Academy, their lessons are planned and delivered by the teachers in the Academy for the majority of their timetable. It is important that the teaching your child receives is good teaching from a subject specialist. The Specialist Provision staff give advice and support and additional help your child may need in their lessons.

Students with visual impairments often receive support from different staff. How often they are supported depends on their specific needs. We make sure they have modified large print or braille and specialist technology if needed to make sure they can be as independent as possible.

Sometimes to help children and young people with a visual impairment they need part of additional curriculum teaching to help them. Your child may receive some extra teaching or training by a member of staff from the Specialist Provision in things that they need help with because of their visual impairment e.g. independent travel skills or specialist careers advice.

Every half term we do interventions with all the students in the Specialist Provision. We use an ‘Assess, Plan, Do, Review’ to look at what is working well and where your child may need more help. You are welcome to attend these interventions to talk about how your child is doing.

How will the curriculum be matched to my child or young person’s needs?
The curriculum in all schools is planned so that every student can learn and understand what they need to do in all their lessons. Teachers change and adapt lessons to make sure everyone in the class can achieve and learn at their own levels. Work is designed to raise aspirations and develop confidence in their ability to learn.

Children and young people with visual impairment often need extra support; this will be planned by the teachers of visual impairment, other teachers and regularly discussed with you.

This could include:
•  Specialist teaching from a Teacher of Visual Impairment.
•  Training to Staff.
•  Support in lessons from a Specialist Educational Teaching Assistant.
•  Training in use of Low Vision Aids (e.g. magnifiers).
•  Access to Specialist Technology (e.g. CCTV, ipads, modified laptops).
•  Provision of modified large print or braille for all lessons.
•  Access to Mobility/Habilitation Officers.
•  Additional support for exams (Access Arrangements e.g. readers, scribes, practical assistants).

How will both you and I know how my child or young person is doing and how will you help me to support their learning?
We regularly look at how students are doing in their lessons as well as the levels they are achieving. By doing this we can make sure, they are getting the right support to help them.

Every half term we do interventions with all the students in the Specialist Provision. We use an ‘Assess, Plan, Do, Review’ to look at what is working well and where your child may need more help. You are welcome to attend these interventions to talk about how your child is doing.

Where students are not making expected progress we:
•  Speak to parents and carers.
•  Meet with teachers to discuss and plan ways to support you child.
•  Consider the need to involve outside agencies.

All the students in the Specialist Provision have a Statement/Education Health Care Plan which means that a formal Annual Review will take place to discuss progress and a report will be written at least once a year. Parents are invited to attend these meeting as well as staff from the Specialist Provision and other staff from the Academy or outside agencies e.g. Careers.

What support will there be for my child or young person’s overall wellbeing?
All staff appreciate the importance of young people having high self-esteem in order to achieve positive wellbeing. Each year group is led by a Learning Leader. Your child will also have a form tutor who should be your child’s first point of contact for any worries or concerns.

The form tutor can liaise with the SENCO if they feel your child requires additional intervention or support; this may then involve working with outside agencies where appropriate.

If your child has a recognised medical need, a health care plan will be created to ensure this need is managed effectively.

What specialist services and expertise are available at or accessed by the setting, school or college?
Moor End Academy is proud to be the host of one the Specialist Provisions for Visual Impairment within Kirklees.  The Academy has 12 permanent places for secondary aged students with severe visual impairment. In addition, the Specialist Provision provides outreach support for Secondary aged students in their local mainstream schools who have a visual impairment.

The Specialist Provision has staff that specialise in visual impairment. They receive extra training in VI to help them to support your child.

Ofsted (2012)

The academy has a specially resourced provision for students with special educational needs, managed by the local authority. Twelve students with a visual impairment are supported by this unit and are fully integrated into the Academy.

A higher than average proportion of students gain five or more GCSEs at grades A* to G. This enables almost all students, including disabled students and those with special educational needs, to progress to education, training or employment at age 16. For example, all four visually impaired students in Year 11 have progressed to A level courses post-16. The high- quality and extensive provision of modified learning resources using enlarged print, Braille and tactile graphics makes an invaluable contribution to the progress made by visually impaired students. These students receive sensitively tailored support for their individual needs which develops their skills and confidence to live more independently

Moor End Academy Inspection report June 2012

What staff training is in place to support children and young people with visual impairment?
The Specialist Provision has staff that specialise in visual impairment. They receive extra training in visual impairment to help them to support your child.

The Specialist Provision team have offered training for teaching and support staff. Training varies from school to school. It will depend upon their previous knowledge of visual impairment and how much training they have had before.

At Moor End Academy, all staff receive annual training and updates throughout the year. Staff are supplied with ways to help information sheers for individual students. For new teachers an additional training session is held as part of their
induction to the Academy.

Typically, training is customised to teach staff about your child’s specific eye conditions and needs. It will help staff to understand how they can best support your child to achieve.

We also deliver peer awareness sessions, to help your child’s friends understand the difficulties your child may have because of their visual impairment and how they can help them.

We work closely with the Ophthalmology Services at both Huddersfield Royal Infirmary and Dewsbury District Hospital. The medical staff who work specifically with people with visual impairment share information about your child’s eye condition and vision. This helps us to make sure that the advice and support we are giving to your child is up to date and accurate.

How will my child or young person be included in activities outside the classroom including school trips?
The students with a visual impairment at Moor End Academy are a full part of an inclusive Academy community. They are welcomed to attend and be a part of all extra-curricular activities and opportunities offered by the Academy, including visits. All students are accompanied by a member of staff who has experience in working with young people with a visual impairment. Most often this is an educational teaching assistant from the Specialist Provision.

Recently students have taken part in;
•  Skiing trips - residential
•  Trip to Germany - residential
•  Visit to Local bookshops
•  3D day trip to NG Bailey – local businesses
•  Regular visits to local Colleges

All students are welcome to attend after extra-curricular clubs, but please be aware student transport cannot be rearranged to accommodate this if it is after 3pm.

We currently have students who are Student Leaders and have extra responsibilities around Academy.

How accessible is your environment for children and young people with a visual impairment?
All Year 6 students who join the Specialist Provision at Moor End Academy work closely with a habilitation officer as part of their transition. They have regular visits to learn their way around the Academy to make sure they can move around the building safely before they start in Year 7.

The habilitation officers also work closely with the Academy to advise on appropriate adaptations to the building, for example markings on stairs and blind or curtains in classrooms.

How will you prepare and support my child or young person to join the setting, school or college, and how will you support them to move on the next stage of education, or move on to adult life?
Students that join the Specialist Provision in Year 7 have many chances to come and visit Moor End Academy as part of their transition from primary school. They will meet all the staff and other students and look around the base. All students will have extra visits with a mobility or habilitation officer to help them to learn how to get around the building.

For Year 11 students we work closely with a specialist Careers Advisor, Hilary Newsome to make sure your child knows all the choices they can make for choosing their next steps in education or work. Parents and carers are welcome to attend these meetings. They will get the opportunity to visit colleges as part of the Academy visits and often, additional visits are organised when they have chosen their courses. Again as for Year 6 pupils all students will have extra visits with a mobility or habilitation officer to help them to learn how to get around their new building.

How are decisions made about what type and how much support my child or young person will receive?
We use the NatSIP Eligibility Criteria to band children according to their level of need. This detailed list of questions considering what a child may need. For example, level of visual impairment, the training a school might need or if the child uses print or braille to read. We use the same criteria for children and young people within the Specialist Provision and those who are supported through outreach.

This then helps us to make sure the support and resources we give to your child matches their individual needs. We can make sure our resources and staff are shared in the way that helps all children and young people with a visual impairment.

Below are some examples of children in different bands.

Student 1 – Band 1 (Outreach)
Student 1 was born blind, but Doctors do not know why. His parents chose for him to attend his local secondary school with his friends from primary school. He has a Statement for his visual impairment. He uses braille and a laptop which has specialist software on it that speaks everything he types or clicks on.

The teacher of visual impairment works closely with his parents, teachers and his teaching assistant to make sure that he can access the curriculum. The school have received lots of training on how to support Student 1. The teacher of visual impairment goes into his school weekly to teach him braille. He works regularly with a habilitation officer to practice using his cane and he is learning how to use buses to get into Huddersfield.

Student 2 – Band 2 (Specialist Provision)
Student 2 is in Y10 has Oculo-Cutaneous Albinism which means she has a severe visual impairment, for which she has an ECHP. She uses size 24 font and an ipad in lessons. When she uses the computers in the Academy she has modified settings which make the icons bigger and she uses a magnifying mouse.

The teacher of visual impairment supports her in geography lessons as Student 2 finds this subject very difficult due to her visual impairment. In other lessons she has support from specialist ETAs. The Lead Teacher has worked closely with the Exams Officer in school to make sure all the access arrangements Student 2 needs are in place ready for her GCSE exams.

Student 3 – Band 3 (Outreach)
Student 3 is in Y11 and has retinitis pigmentosa which affects his peripheral vision. He does not need larger font as long as his teachers make sure worksheets are clear and not cluttered. He has been practicing touch-typing to help him in case his vision gets worse.

The teacher of visual impairment monitors Student 3’s vision and meets with him and the SENCo every term. He has been working with the habilitation worker to practice his routes to and from his new college.

Student 4 –Band 4 (Outreach)
Student 4 has Nystagmus, which means that her eyes move side to side, this can make her vision blurry and gets worse when she is tired or stressed. She does not need large print and can use a computer with a normal setup. Student 4 finds it difficult to keep up in class when she has to write or read things quickly.

The teacher of visual impairment visited Student 4 at the start of term, observed her in class, and had a meeting with her teachers. All the staff know what they need to do to help Student 4, if they need anymore help they know how to contact the teacher of visual impairment.

Who can I contact for further information?
If you have concerns about your child in Moor End Academy or their local school, you could speak to;
•  Your child’s form tutor.
•  Your child’s SENCo.
•  The Teacher for VI that supports your child.
•  The Lead Teacher for VI.

For specific information about the Specialist Provision for Visual Impairment at Moor End Academy you should contact Laura Foden, the Lead Teacher for VI.

For information about how other Kirklees Specialist Provision support, children and young people with Special Educational Needs please contact:
  Clare Burdett
  01924 483744
  cburdett@newsomehigh.kirklees.sch.uk

EAL Department

At Moor End Academy we welcome students from all over the world.  Many will speak English as an additional language (EAL).  The EAL department offer language support to those at an early stage of learning English, as well as to students who have more advanced skills but may still make language errors.

The key aim of the EAL department is to support students in order to facilitate their access to the full curriculum.

The EAL department strive to ensure students
•  Feel welcome, motivated and supported by the department and the Academy
•  Enjoy learning English
•  Become increasingly confident, competent and independent listeners, speakers, readers and writers
•  Make good progress in English in relation to challenging and achievable targets
•  Have access to the curriculum in all subject areas
•  Have opportunity to develop their first or other language skills

The EAL system at Moor End Academy has been developed to help students new to the UK settle in as quickly as possible.

On arrival: students have an induction meeting with parents and translators if required before starting at the Academy.  They will have a brief assessment of their English skills and non-verbal reasoning so that we can see how best to support them.  We try to place students according to their academic potential and previous educational experience
•  Welcome Pack: provided to new arrivals containing useful school information and subject specific key words and phrases translated in to heritage languages
Buddies: new students are introduced to a buddy in their tutor group who will look after them while they settle in.  Where possible this will be a student who speaks the same heritage language.  The buddies show their new friends around the Academy and take care of them during breaks and lunchtimes so that they don’t feel alone
•  EAL staff: students are introduced to the EAL staff who will be working with them.  As well as developing and improving their use of English, we attach a great deal of importance to the students’ well-being
•  Types of support: support is offered at a range of levels and individual needs are taken in to account.  Depending on their level of English, students may receive weekly individual, or small group sessions to develop fluency in reading, writing or speaking.  More advanced EAL learners are usually supported in mainstream lessons such as English, Maths and Science.  All students are welcome to attend homework clubs or subject booster sessions
First Language: heritage languages of EAL students are valued and where possible the students are encouraged to sit GCSE exams in their first language
•  After school activities: we encourage EAL students to take part in the variety of extra-curricular activities which happen every day after school.  This is an excellent way for students to practise their English outside of the classroom and make new friends
•  Exam support: if a student has been in England for less than two years they may be able to have 25% additional time in GCSE exams.

Outside Agencies

The school works with a number of external agencies to seek advice and support to ensure that the needs of all children are fully understood and met. These include:

School Nurse – The Academy nurse, Mrs Sally Waller is assigned to the Academy and can be contacted via the SENCO. There is also access to a range of other specialist nurses e.g. Epilepsy and Diabetes.

Social Care – The Academy has access to, and works closely with Social Care in supporting both our students and their families as necessary

Speech and Language Therapy (SaLT) – The Academy has access to this therapy service based in Halifax and support may include the following:
• Assessing students individual communication needs and providing the Academy and home with a plan identifying strategies and targets to work towards
• Providing advice, games and activities for the Academy or home to work on with the student

Educational Psychology – Access to the Academy’s Educational Psychologists, Dr Jonathan Middleton and Dr April Frearson is dependent on individual student need through discussion with the SENCo, teachers and parents/carers.  The Educational Psychologists work with students to carry out assessessments and observations in order to identify areas of need and effective strategies to support student learning.
Sensory and Physical Impairment – This service also includes support for Hearing Impairment and can provide advice and guidance to the Academy, students and parents/carers.  This ensures students have the appropriate resources and
support needed to have full access to learning

Child & Adolescent Mental Health (CAMHS) – The professionals in this service can support young people where there are concerns about their emotional wellbeing and mental health.  They can also work with families and carers

Targeted Youth Support (TYS) – this service is accessed through the Local Authority and can support young people when there are concerns about education, safeguarding, anti-social or risk taking behaviours

Stronger Families - The programme aims to build strong and resilient communities, where families are encouraged and supported in bringing up their children responsibly, so that all members of the family realise their full capabilities and strengths to contribute positively to society and the economy

FAQs

How does Moor End Academy know if young people need extra help?
Young people may be identified as having additional needs through a variety of ways including the following:
•  Information from previous schools and academies
•  The Young Person is performing below age expected levels
•  Concerns raised by parent or carer
•  Concerns raised by teacher or tutor
•  Liaison with external agencies
•  Health diagnosis through paediatrician or doctor
•  Entry testing for students arriving from other countries

We continually track the progress of our students through classroom based assessments and measure progress in learning against National and age related Expectations.

How will Moor End support my child with additional needs?
Additional needs means any child or young person with a physical, sensory, communication, or learning disability, or a long-term or life-limiting condition. This may also include children with emotional health and wellbeing needs where there is an impact on their daily life, including those with more significant mental health problems.

The SENCO will ensure that all students with additional needs are supported in order to access the curriculum; this is closely monitored and interventions or alternative teaching strategies are used where necessary. Teaching Assistants work with young people individually or as part of a group in the classroom and the SEN Teacher can provide more specific intervention on a one-to-one or small group basis, modify resources, provide additional classes and offer targeted programmes for example accelerated reader.

How will the curriculum be matched to the needs of my child?
The curriculum is designed to be accessible for all students and work is adapted appropriately to meet the needs of the individual. All young people can access the lesson and learn at their level. Work is designed to raise aspirations and develop confidence in their ability to learn.

How do we know if the support or strategies used have had an impact?
Student progress is regularly monitored and support or strategies reviewed and adapted where appropriate. In addition, students are assessed twice a year for their reading, comprehension and spelling ability.

Where students are not making expected progress we:
•  Involve parents/carers to meet and discuss how your child is getting on.
•  Liaise with staff to discuss existing strategies and further plan ways to support the student.
•  Consider the need to involve outside agencies.

The team base their support on an ‘Assess, Plan, Do, Review’ process to measure impact and this is discussed every half-term.

If your child has complex needs, they may have a “Statement” or an “Education, Health and Care plan” (EHC), which means that a formal Annual Review will take place to discuss progress and a report will be written. This can also be done at a six-monthly interim review if changes to circumstances occur or concerns arise.

What support will there be for my child’s overall wellbeing?
All staff appreciate the importance of young people having high self-esteem in order to achieve positive wellbeing. Each year group is led by a Head of Year. Your child will also have a form tutor who should be your child’s first point of contact for any worries or concerns.

The form tutor can liaise with the SENCO if they feel your child requires additional intervention or support; this may then involve working with outside agencies where appropriate.

If your child has a recognised medical need, a health care plan will be created to ensure this need is managed effectively.

What specialist services and expertise are available at Moor End Academy?
Our SENCO is fully qualified and accredited and liaises with all other staff at the academy. All staff at the academy are qualified to devise strategies and identify appropriate methods of teaching, so students can access the curriculum. Teaching staff are required to provide the SENCO with feedback on the student's progress as part of the process  of reviewing his or her needs. As an academy, we work closely with any external agencies that we feel are relevant and necessary to the wellbeing of the child.

What training have staff had or going to have?
The SENCO along with the Academy's senior management team ensure that all staff receive continuous, up-to-date training and have easy access to high quality advice and support, to ensure the best possible support for your child. All teaching staff understand their responsibilities under the SEN Code of Practice and know how to seek advice from specialists on less common types of special educational needs. and have a constant awareness of the diverse range of needs that could affect the health/learning of your child.

What are the Governor’s responsibilities?
The Academy has a dedicated Governor whose responsibility it is to monitor the effectiveness of SEN and Inclusion within the Academy. They regularly receive reports on the progress of students with SEN and ensure they maintain an up to date knowledge of statutory changes and requirements. They visit the academy twice a year to undertake a "deep dive" into our provision.

How will my child be included in activities outside the classroom including trips?
All children are included in all parts of the academy curriculum and will be included on academy trips. If necessary, we provide support to ensure this is successful and their needs are met. Risk assessments are provided for any off-site activity with briefing session held beforehand to involve parents and allow for any queries to be answered.

How accessible is our Academy environment?
The academy is not suitable for students who require the use of a wheelchair. However, there are facilities available for parents/visitors who require wheelchair access.

Disabled toilet facilities are available for use by students, staff, parents/carers and visitors.

A specialist unit for visually impaired students is on site and more information for this can be found on our website.

For students whose first language is not English, we can provide multi-lingual support and resources for meetings with parents/carers.

How will you prepare and support my child to move between the different phases of education?
A programme of induction is in place which provides students with an opportunity to visit the academy before their transition. The SEN department link closely with feeder schools and academies to ensure the best support for your child at this time.

Peer Mentors from Year 8, guide students to lessons and break times for the first two weeks and are on hand to advise students.

Transition from the academy to college is supported by taster days and the SEN department have strong links with further education providers and provide information to ensure success after Moor End Academy is maintained.

The academy employs a careers advisor to help prepare students for college interviews and to ensure they are aware of the expectations of further education. The careers advisor attends annual reviews from Year 9 onwards.

How are decisions made about what type and how much support my child will receive?
A student arriving with an EHC plan (Educational Health and Care plan) or a Statement will receive the level of support suggested in the document. This is overseen by the SENCO.

Students with an additional need but without a Statement or EHC will be assessed by the SENCO, SEN Teacher or Senior ETA in conjunction with parental/carer discussions and possible advice from outside agencies to accurately establish the level of support provided by the Academy.

Parents/carers are actively encouraged to contribute to and attend meetings about their child’s wellbeing and provision.

What arrangements are there for supporting children or young people who are looked after by the local authority and have SEN?
Looked after children are nine times more likely to have a statement of special educational needs or EHC than the general student population. It is important that all children with SEN receive the educational provision which meets their needs. However for looked after children, many of whom will have had difficult and unstable home and education before coming into care, it is imperative that their needs are quickly and efficiently assessed and provided for so that the effects of any instability on their education is reduced to a minimum. The local authority Educational Psychologist has statutory duties associated with the identification and assessment of SEN within looked after children.

To support the young person Moor End Academy
•  ensures that all looked after children of compulsory education age have an effective and high quality Personal Education Plan (PEP)
•  ensure that, in partnership with relevant educational professionals, there is a robust assessment of the child’s learning styles
•  ensure that the relevant local authority representative as specified in the PEP attends parents’ evenings and other relevant meetings, such as the annual reviews of a statement of special educational needs
•  ensures that the funding and processes are in place
•  mediate on behalf of a looked after child when he or she faces problems at the academy
•  ensure that social workers, carers and, where appropriate, parents actively promote opportunities for looked after children to participate in high quality learning experiences, including out of academy hours learning activities
•  Supporting educational achievement and aspirations of looked after children by giving carers maximum support to provide help to children in terms of academy homework and wider educational opportunities

What support is there for improving emotional and social development, including extra pastoral support for listening to the views of young people with SEN and measures to prevent bullying?
We will explore the dynamics and interaction between victim, perpetrators with a special focus on Special Educational Needs and Disability. Students have opportunities to express their views on bullying through questionnaires, interviews and by representing the student voice through student leaders. We are members of The Bullying Intervention Group who's aims are:
•  Every child has a right to safety
•  Every child has a right to learn
•  Every child has a right to participate
•  Every child has a right to have their views heard
•  Every child is actively engaged in the academy community bullying awareness and how to keep themselves and others safe.

How is attendance monitored?
Attendance of every child is monitored on a daily basis. Lateness and absence are recorded and reported to the Student Support and Wellbeing Team. Good attendance is actively encouraged throughout the academy and rewarded. We will contact you via text/telephone if your child is absent from the academy.

Who can I contact for further information?
Your first point of contact to discuss your child’s needs would always be the form teacher and then following this you may need to speak to Miss S Davies, SENCO (Special Educational Needs Coordinator).

What arrangements are there for handling complaints from parents of children with SEN about the provision made at the academy?
Moor End Academy takes any concerns raised by parents and carers seriously. Any parent or carer who wants to make a complaint should follow the academy’s complaints procedure on the academy website. This policy ensures that any issues are resolved in a fair, balanced and transparent manner in line with our aim of providing a safe environment for learning.

How is the local offer reviewed?
Our local offer is reviewed and updated on a regular basis to reflect the changing needs of the children who join and are developing in our academy. Part of this review process will involve contributions for parents and carers.